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The Green Détente: Environmental Negotiations as a Trust-Building Mechanism for the Two Koreas

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Title: The Green Détente: Environmental Negotiations as a Trust-Building Mechanism for the Two Koreas
Author: Peter Chang Yup Kim
Affiliation: Johns Hopkins University
Issue: Peace & Stability – Volume 7 Issue 1
Publisher: Yonsei University Press
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ABSTRACT

Countries worldwide are increasingly attempting to address issues involving climate change and the environment, and the same phenomenon is occurring in the Korean Peninsula. The Republic of Korea is taking a growing leadership role in the global movement towards green growth. But what if this momentum was directed closer to home? This paper aims to assess the Green Détente as a policy mechanism for trust-building on the Korean Peninsula. It attempts to explore whether opportunities are available for environmental cooperation between the two Koreas as a stepping stone to future bilateral exchange.

Transient Professionals: Local NGO Empowerment

Title: Transient Professionals: Local NGO Empowerment Cover Page
Author: Ted Voelkel
Affiliation: Graduate School of International Studies at Yonsei University
Issue: Law & Order – Volume 6 Issue 1
Publisher: Yonsei University Press
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South Korea’s native-English-speaking hakwon (South Korea’s version of a private language school) instructor population is college-educated, well paid, and yet suffers from a lack of empowerment via a representative organization of its own creation. Of the attempts made by instructors to form such an NGO to advocate on their behalf the Association of Teachers of English in Korea (ATEK) stands out as perhaps the most ambitious, in spite of its rather short tenure and eventual collapse. Typical explanations given for that collapse can be divided among those internal, such as in fighting, and external, such as online harassment, but this paper seeks to show that such explanations remain insufficient. Using material obtained through interviews with former members, along with information gleaned from various online sources, this paper argues that a lack of official recognition of the organization by the South Korean government can be seen as the proverbial straw that broke the back of ATEK. Further, application of theoretical material presented in Bringing Transnational Relations Back in: Introduction by Thomas Risse-Kappen, regarding the way in which domestic governmental structure can either allow transnational actors access to that structure or not, will show that domestic actors such as ATEK are subject to the same sort of institutional discrimination. It is the author’s hope that the examination of ATEK’s collapse presented in this paper will constitute a useful framework to guide upstart instructor NGOs of the future, so that similar problems can be successfully avoided.

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Why has the Diaoyu/Senkaku Dispute been Intensified and What are the Possible Resolutions?

Title: Why has the Diaoyu/Senkaku Dispute been Intensified and What are the Possible Resolutions?FALL2013 COVER OUT IMAGE
Author: Eunsil Park
Affiliation: Yonsei University
Issue: Changes & Transitions – Volume 5 Issue 2
Publisher: Yonsei University Press
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The Diaoyu/Senkaku dispute is a territorial conflict between China and Japan, and there have been ups and downs over several decades. As China’s assertiveness has been increased from the late 2000s, much attention has been paid to the relationship between China and Japan. The issue is related with each state’s strategic, economic and symbolic interests, which makes the nature of the dispute complex. In this paper, it is argued that the growing tension between China and Japan is largely influenced by the changing international structure due to the rise of China, and the issue is reinforced by domestic politics as the politicians could utilize the issue as a political tool to gain public support based upon strong nationalism in China and Japan. There are three options available to resolve the conflict: military confrontation, the US intervention, and the international legal institution. These options will be critiqued with a meaningful analysis, and the paper suggests that a long-term resolution should be adopted by emphasizing the importance of public education and cooperative measures to develop the area for both states’ benefits after recovering mutual trust.

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Emerging Donors and Knowledge Sharing for Development: The Case of Korea

Title: Emerging Donors and Knowledge Sharing for Development: The Case of KoreaFALL2013 COVER OUT IMAGE
Author: Moctar Aboubacar
Affiliation: A Project Manager at the World Food Program’s Rwanda Country Office
Issue: Changes & Transitions – Volume 5 Issue 2
Publisher: Yonsei University Press
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The field of international development cooperation has been heavily influenced by “emerging donors”, countries which have seen significant development and which have begun to form their own international development programs. Countries like South Korea are capitalizing on their own development history to engage developing countries to learn from successful past policy experiences. However South Korea’s burgeoning knowledge sharing programs present an important set of pitfalls; the state’s quasi-monopoly over how the country’s past development is interpreted, along with the narrow conception of the development experiences to be shared both limit the effectiveness of exporting such policies. Korea can capitalize on the wealth of lessons from its past development on the international stage if it presents a convincing heterodox paradigm for development while opening up interpretations of the past to wider societal debate, and if it shifts to an understanding of its own development history which transcends sole economic interpretations.

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The Donga Ilbo Advertising Coercion and Forced Layoff Case

FALL2013 COVER OUT IMAGE

Title: The Donga Ilbo Advertising Coercion and Forced Layoff Case
Author: Seongbak Jin
Affiliation: Yonsei University
Issue: Changes and Transitions – Volume 5, Issue 2
Publisher: Yonsei University Press
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This paper looks at the Donga Ilbo Advertising Coercion and Forced Layoff Case in South Korea during the years 1974-1975, focusing on the confluence of three institutions: the press, the state, and commercial forces. A look into history finds that the state, dissatisfied with the Donga Ilbo’s reporting, leveraged market forces to force it into compliance with its view of proper reporting. This represented a watershed moment in the history of press-state relations in South Korea. The highly contentious state-press relationship, observed at the time of the layoff, can still be seen today. To explore the relationship between the press, the state, and commercial forces, this paper does the following: First, theories of media are introduced to provide a basis for analysis. Second, a brief history of the Korean press leading up the Donga Ilbo case is covered followed by a detailed overview of the layoff case itself. Lastly, the paper concludes by commenting on the implications of a contentious state-press relationship and current government-media relations in South Korea.

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